WHAT THE HELL

Kevin Brennan Writes About What It's Like

Nice work if you can’t get it

dollar sign

Just got back from my trip to see my mom in St. Louie, and instead of fleshing out a new post I thought I’d share with you another in a series of pieces about the trend toward unpaid labor in the arts and professions. This is an interview with a British journalist who has written a book on the subject. Guess what? He was approached by the Huffington Post to do an article on unpaid work, for which he would not be paid.

stop-working-for-freeO, irony! Thou art so heavy-handed sometimes!

By the way, I still need volunteers to test my pdf file of “Gatecrash” on their e-readers. I’m especially interesting in testing tablets and Kindles other than the basic one.

Step right up!

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18 comments on “Nice work if you can’t get it

  1. ericjbaker
    May 4, 2016

    Would this be an acceptable to time to say, “Go Blues”?

    Not particularly a Blues fan, but I am grateful, for the time being, that they knocked off the Hawks.

    • Kevin Brennan
      May 4, 2016

      I’ve learned not to put any faith into the Blues. They’ve been disappointing me since I was 10 years old.

      But yeah. Bye bye Blackhawks!

      • ericjbaker
        May 4, 2016

        I’m rooting for anyone in the west to beat Pitt or Washington, but I especially would like to see the Blues finally win one for the fans. That franchise is older than me, and that’s not easy to do.

      • Kevin Brennan
        May 4, 2016

        I watched them get swept in the finals three times, when I was at a very impressionable age. I learned that dreams don’t come true … 😪

  2. 1WriteWay
    May 4, 2016

    And there’s this from the article: “extreme sense of entitlement amongst many consumers when it comes to paying for creative work. You can see the impact of this across many creative industries, where consumers are often unwilling to pay for music/films/good journalism and see no ethical dilemma in downloading the work for free.” Even when writers and artists get paid, it’s a pittance for the majority compared the 1% in the stratosphere of celebrity. If I was never to get paid anything for my writing, I’ll probably still write, but I wouldn’t share except with me, myself, and I.

    • ericjbaker
      May 4, 2016

      I worked with a “Millennial” lad (the exact person who springs to mind when you hear the label). He refused to pay for any song, book, or movie. He said, ‘Why should I? It’s there for the taking.”

      I said, “So are the candy bars under the cash register at CVS. Go ahead and take some next time you’re in there and see what happens.”

      • Kevin Brennan
        May 4, 2016

        I like that analogy. I’m sure he said, “I’d never do that. It’s stealing.” Doh!

      • 1WriteWay
        May 4, 2016

        Perfect!

    • Kevin Brennan
      May 4, 2016

      You can only hope that what goes around comes around … 😈

  3. John W. Howell
    May 4, 2016

    I have the basic Kindle. Sorry.

  4. LionAroundWriting
    May 4, 2016

    Screw the HuffPo.
    As for free work. It isnt work then, its volunteering. Nice linkage.

    • Kevin Brennan
      May 5, 2016

      Thanks. I don’t know why anyone would volunteer for some of these outfits that are worth a billion bucks!

  5. Audrey Driscoll
    May 4, 2016

    Maybe it’s my self-published persona, but this seems to be part of the package where writers are regarded with suspicion or disdain by a variety of gatekeepers. No wonder we’re expected to work for free, and be grateful for the opportunity.

    • Kevin Brennan
      May 5, 2016

      Yes, it’s like “Only the big kids get paid for their work, you pipsqueak!” But the HuffPo story reveals that even pros are having to give stuff away in the name of “exposure.” Grrrr!

      • Audrey Driscoll
        May 5, 2016

        It must be due to too many writers, not enough readers (because of all the distractions from reading). Not a reason to stop writing, though, just harder to make a living from it, or even pocket change.

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This entry was posted on May 4, 2016 by in Writing and tagged , , .
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