WHAT THE HELL

Kevin Brennan Writes About What It's Like

Dem bones, Dem bones …

Democratic leaders figuring out what to do next

I can’t decide: Are the Dems hapless or feckless? Do they lack more hap or more feck?

Seriously: Why does it feel like the they got played again? I mean, for one brief shining moment I thought they might have had an injection of titanium into their spines, actually voting against the continuing resolution to keep the government open on Friday. By Monday all that titanium had leaked out of the obvious orifice.

I’m sure they got wind of polling that suggested the public was blaming them and Trump for the shutdown, with only 18% fingering the Republicans (and that does sound icky, I know). That meant they would have to have resolve, which is something we’ve all had trouble associating with the Democratic party.

Like Susan Collins before them (in exchange for her vote on the tax bill), they accepted a vague promise from Mitch McConnell to take up DACA and immigration reform sometime after February 8, when the latest agreement ends. But Collins already knows that McConnell was shining her on – as everyone at the time understood – and that her concerns about the tax bill will never be addressed. Then again, she, and the Dems, were probably just looking for cover for their votes. Both seem completely lame in the aftermath.

Now Chuck Schumer declares that Trump’s goofus wall is off the table because Trump backed away from the private agreement they’d made over cheeseburgers at the White House. Trump fires back: No wall, no DACA.

Guess who’s going to win that shootout …

At a time when the Dems need to consolidate their base and produce maximal turnout in the November elections, they’re serving lukewarm milquetoast for the next nine months.

I guess my question is easy to answer after all. Hapless is just unfortunate. Feckless is lacking strong character.

Boom.

16 comments on “Dem bones, Dem bones …

  1. pinklightsabre
    January 25, 2018

    Sounds Scottish, “Feck.” Sounds nearly profane too, wonder if there’s a connection? What the hell, what the feck.

    • Kevin Brennan
      January 25, 2018

      Those Scots know how to call ’em like they see ’em, eh?

  2. S.K. Nicholls
    January 25, 2018

    Feck them all…dems, pubs…the whole hapless bunch.

    • Kevin Brennan
      January 25, 2018

      We seem to be living in the Age of Fecklessness … 😐

  3. kingmidget
    January 25, 2018

    I’m not sure who won or who lost here, Kevin. We won’t know until we get through this latest round continuing resolutions and see what the DACA resolution ultimately is. What I continue to see is that Trump will continue to manage via chaos and controversy — a skill he has mastered and he has clearly also mastered the PR war (as he has demonstrated for almost three years now, ever since he announced his candidacy). The DACA issue is a perfect example. Every day we read of a different position he has taken on DACA. Every single day.

    The rest of these poor slobs on both sides of the aisle are just pawns, to be honest. They simply have no idea how to respond to him while also protecting their flanks. Which is why I say the best way to deal with him is to ignore him. What people continue to do now is provide the oxygen that fuels his fire. Dems and Reeps (who really care) need to stop doing that.

    • Kevin Brennan
      January 25, 2018

      In this particular case, it doesn’t really feel like Trump was the focus for a change. But once again the D’s come off looking weak, and that’s not a very galvanizing strategy for November. You can just see the compromise that’s going to come of all this: Donald gets his wall and the Dems get a flimsy version of DACA that will probably expire in 2020. Ugh.

      • kingmidget
        January 25, 2018

        Curious to hear what you think of what Trump’s people have come out today saying is the deal he would support. Seems pretty strong on DACA and a few other things. My first read is that it is a compromise and somewhat comprehensive. And being a comprehensive, it has some good and some bad for everybody. I’ll never support a wall, but if it’s the cost of getting something comprehensive and reasonably fair in other areas, it may be the best we can get with this Administration and I’m tired of kicking the can down the road on this topic.

      • Kevin Brennan
        January 25, 2018

        You can probably imagine what I think of the offer … 😡

      • kingmidget
        January 26, 2018

        Which parts do you object to?

      • Kevin Brennan
        January 26, 2018

        Well, first and foremost, $25 billion for the goddamn wall. It won’t work, and it’s a horrendous symbol.

        Second, the fact that the deal is “take it or leave it.”

        And third, the various restrictions proposed are moving away from policy dealing with illegal immigration and toward policy against most immigration.

        As usual, there’s a racial tinge here, unless you’re lucky enough be from Norway …

      • kingmidget
        January 26, 2018

        I don’t like the “take it or leave it” approach either, but the reality is that people say that in these types of negotiations all the time without really meaning it. It’s also a likely reality that once Trump sees the right-wing backlash, he will backtrack all on his own. That said …

        I’m a firm believer in compromise needed here. I agree that the “wall” is a horrible symbol but I also believe that we do need to do something about the flow of illegal immigrants into this country. What that something is, I’m not sure, but I also believe that the “wall” has become somewhat figurative with Trump. There may be some physical blockades built in spots (there already were before he was elected), but at rare moments he has acknowledged that the wall really is not just a wall along the border, but in many places it will be more about surveillance, cameras and technology. I would love to know more about the details and be confident that he will stick with something specific though.

        Regarding the various restrictions, I think there’s a lot of gray area there. I’m not sure it is as anti-immigration as you suggest. But the details and their impact really aren’t that clear yet.

      • Kevin Brennan
        January 26, 2018

        All true. We’ll have to see what shakes out. I expect the hard right will do considerable damage to it before all’s said and done, though. 😉

      • kingmidget
        January 26, 2018

        The way I read the current mood and reaction to this proposal, there are enough anti-immigration right-wingers who are opposed to his plan that it likely won’t go anywhere.

  4. Woebegone but Hopeful
    January 25, 2018

    The idea of an entire collection of independently wealthy adults shutting down the running of government and playing chicken with other people’s livelihoods, is never going to play well.
    This year it was the Democrats who got the blame, next year it will be The Republicans.

    • Kevin Brennan
      January 25, 2018

      It’s definitely fraught. A pox upon them all!

      • Woebegone but Hopeful
        January 26, 2018

        In the UK we would judge they are definitely playing at ‘silly buggers’

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This entry was posted on January 25, 2018 by in Et alia and tagged .
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